Targeted Landing Pages Are Key in On-line Audiology Marketing

targeted landing pagesAllowing a consumer to understand the details on a hearing healthcare website can be extremely challenging. The jargon we use can become complicated and if your Practice offers a variety of different services, prospective customers can get confused. If this happens you risk them not knowing where to go and leaving the website altogether. Not an ideal situation and a poor reward for your work to get them to your site in the first place. 

In order to avoid this and to give your website the best possible chance of converting prospects into enquiries and then Patients. You should really consider the use of targeted landing pages for each of your services.  A landing page is simply a page that focuses on one specific element in your offering. They should follow simple formula, good design, focused copy and a clear call-to-action.

For example, if you are promoting your tinnitus treatment services, make sure the page is deployed with good SEO principles. Ensure that tinnitus services or tinnitus relief is in the page URL and the headline. Use a clear subhead explaining the efficacy of the treatment or your success rate. This is to clearly grab their interest and hopefully they will read what follows.

Landing pages that are visually appealing, but not distracting are the best. An effective landing page will contain a brief amount of copy with strong headlines

Landing Pages: Merging Differences

Landing Pages: Merging Differences (Photo credit: Kaeru)

that address key points in relevance to the service or product. The use of a graphic element is important, people love the pretty pictures, it’s human nature. So a photo or graphic that has relevance to the condition, product or the service should be included. It could also be a good idea to include a Patient testimonial video if you have one. Alternatively a Practice video with you detailing the product or service. 

It’s imperative that you do not clutter the page with long and detailed jargon filled explanations. Offer them the option to read more with links at the bottom of the page to your blog articles on the subject. In turn support this landing page with anchor text back links from your blog articles. Your website is your shop window, your blog is where you display in depth knowledge and authority. 

Keep the copy short, accurate and to the point. Design it with relevance to the prospect in mind. Design it in order that a prospective Patient wishes to take action and give them a clear easily fulfilled call to action explaining what happens after they take that action. 

Landing pages should be short, simple and focused. Make sure not to include information on other products or services on the page or in the copy. When done properly, the people who land on these pages will be focused on whatever the page is about. They don’t want at this stage information about anything else. 

Always, always, have a clear call-to-action, tell them what to and how to do it. You can use a phone number that you track or an embedded contact form. Always request a prospect to do something, and always make that action simple and hassle-free. In this way you can track the conversion rate on the landing page in order to assess how it is doing.

Landing pages don’t have to be complicated and technical even in the hearing healthcare field. Simplicity works and you will be surprised how a well-designed landing page can increase conversions from viewer to enquiry to Patient.

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About Geoffrey Cooling

my name is Geoffrey Cooling and I am the author here at Just Audiology Stuff. I have been involved in the Hearing Healthcare Profession for several years now. I initially worked as a Hearing Healthcare Professional for a large national retailer in Ireland. After several years in Practice I was approached to work for a manufacturer, where I was employed for five years. I am now the Co Founder of a business called Audiology Engine. We design websites, undertake content marketing and generally look after everything digital for audiological practices. I am also a contributor to many hearing profession periodicals and websites. I have written two commercially available books, The Little Book of Hearing Aids which is written for hearing aid consumers and Audiology Marketing in a Digital World which is written for Audiology Practice Owners. They are both available in Paperback and Kindle versions on Amazon. I also write for consumers on the website Hearing Aid Know, which is a website with the mission of demystifying hearing aids, their types and their technology. I have a great interest in commercial strategy as it applies to Healthcare in general and specifically to Hearing Healthcare. I also have a great interest in the psychology of sales and human interaction. I have been involved with social media for some time, both personally and professionally. I find the engagement and discourse on some social media channels fascinating. I instituted social media strategy for the company I worked for as an experiment. That experiment soon spread throughout the company and I am proud to say that the company is probably one of the most active in the industry. I would like to point out that all views, opinions and thoughts here are mine own. Unless of course they have been planted by the pod people, you just can’t take your eyes off the pod people. Those views do not necessarily reflect upon any views or opinions held by my employer, if I ever get another one. I think that our industry is in the middle of a time of huge change, I think that the change will be forced by both internal and external pressure. I think that private Independent Healthcare Practices will have to be smart and lithe of feet in order to meet these changes. I hope that some of my blatherings are of benefit to those Practices, Independent Hearing Healthcare Practices need to survive. I believe that if that occurs it will be of real benefit to Patients. I hope that I, and my writings will play a small part in their continued success.

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