Practice Branding, Part Of Your Audiology Marketing Strategy

How The Deployment Of A Practice Affects Your Audiology Marketing Strategy

The deployment of your Practice is vitally important to how your Patients and prospective Patients feel about you as a professional and your Practice. In essence, your audiology marketing strategy is intrinsically about shaping perceptions of your prospective Patients.  I have spoke in detail on this before, how can you expect your Patient or prospective Patient to take you seriously if your Practice looks tired, ugly or dirty?

More and more hearing health companies are taking note of branding as it applies to their overall presentation. Branding needs to be considered as a whole of Practice thing, everything in or about your Practice affects how you are perceived, how you are perceived is in fact your brand.

Bonavox Hearing Services In Dundrum, Dublin

With this in mind, I would like to devote a couple of posts to a few Practices I deal with and show you their deployment and why I think it adds immense value to their brand. How in fact that brand is an intrinsic part of their audiology marketing strategy. First off I would like to discuss a new branch, recently opened by the Bonavox Brand in Dundrum in Dublin. The new branch is set at the edge of the Dundrum Shopping Centre in an open plan retail unit.

The designer had a large open plan blank canvas to work with, something that I know we are not all blessed with. But he had and I think he used it very effectively to deploy a modern branch that speaks well to the Bonavox brand.

Bonavox 4photo

As you walk in the door the reception desk is to your left. The desk is at the right height to deal with someone in a wheelchair or on a mobility scooter. The desk is purpose built, in white with a light wood insert, giving a slightly clinical but elegant feel. As you can see on the left of the picture, Welcome is spelled out in polished metal raised letters.

That feel is offset by the hanging lights, hardwood floors and the assorted wall decor. Directly behind the desk is what looks like a dry stone wall with a large TV. The use of stone actually works really well. Adding just the right touch to make the branch interesting and welcoming. The TV is used to show slideshows and videos on constant loop, delivering marketing opportunities and again adding an interesting feature.

Bonavox 1photoTo the right of the door as you come in is the waiting area. It is hard to show with the pictures that I have but the area is circular with the testing rooms off it. The designer has used curved walls consistently in the deployment and the entrance and reception desk seem to flow into the waiting area.

The circular theme is reinforced with specially made curved couches around the centre of the waiting area with a circular coffee table as the focus. Again in this area the stone wall feature is deployed as is another TV.

The stone wall feature surprisingly seems to add warmth to the area instead of sucking it out as you would expect. I have to admit that I was fascinated by the waiting area. I believe that we should strive to make our Patients a community because a community reinforces loyalty. I shall talk about that again, but for now, this waiting area is almost purpose designed to turn your Patients into a community.

I watched with great interest how people who were sitting there engaged with complete strangers because of the convivial atmosphere engendered by the space.

Bonavox 2photo

In the testing and consultation room similar furniture to the reception desk is deployed to good effect. The furniture and decor of these rooms enforces the clinical nature of the room without hardness.

The room is obviously a clinical room but still manages to be welcoming. Again the decor and furniture contribute to this. The desk, which is you catch a glimpse of at the bottom right of the shot is purpose built for audiology testing. with a view block for testing purposes.

The feel of the test room is sympathetic to and enforces the overall branding of the Practice. The overall feeling enforced by the deployment of the Practice is modern professionalism. It enforces trust, the feeling you get is welcoming and comfortable. You feel that you are in a place that you will be looked after. The attitude and manner of the staff, the welcome that they give enforces this. In essence the Practice drives the brand feel home in the Patient’s mind.

You need to be intimate with this concept, your Practice is as much a part of your audiology marketing strategy as any other element that you use. Marketing does not just cover the usual things that we think such as adverts, mailings etc. A marketing strategy should be intertwined with every element of your Practice. Because your brand, whether you believe it or not is intertwined with every element of your Practice.

So the next time you are training your staff to answer the phone, consider your marketing goals. The next time you plan to design a mailer, consider your marketing goals. The next time you paint your Practice, consider your marketing goals. Because all of those elements can and should be thought of as part of your overall branding and audiology marketing strategy.

What do you think?

Regards

Geoff

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About Geoffrey Cooling

my name is Geoffrey Cooling and I am the author here at Just Audiology Stuff. I have been involved in the Hearing Healthcare Profession for several years now. I initially worked as a Hearing Healthcare Professional for a large national retailer in Ireland. After several years in Practice I was approached to work for a manufacturer, where I was employed for five years. I am now the Co Founder of a business called Audiology Engine. We design websites, undertake content marketing and generally look after everything digital for audiological practices. I am also a contributor to many hearing profession periodicals and websites. I have written two commercially available books, The Little Book of Hearing Aids which is written for hearing aid consumers and Audiology Marketing in a Digital World which is written for Audiology Practice Owners. They are both available in Paperback and Kindle versions on Amazon. I also write for consumers on the website Hearing Aid Know, which is a website with the mission of demystifying hearing aids, their types and their technology. I have a great interest in commercial strategy as it applies to Healthcare in general and specifically to Hearing Healthcare. I also have a great interest in the psychology of sales and human interaction. I have been involved with social media for some time, both personally and professionally. I find the engagement and discourse on some social media channels fascinating. I instituted social media strategy for the company I worked for as an experiment. That experiment soon spread throughout the company and I am proud to say that the company is probably one of the most active in the industry. I would like to point out that all views, opinions and thoughts here are mine own. Unless of course they have been planted by the pod people, you just can’t take your eyes off the pod people. Those views do not necessarily reflect upon any views or opinions held by my employer, if I ever get another one. I think that our industry is in the middle of a time of huge change, I think that the change will be forced by both internal and external pressure. I think that private Independent Healthcare Practices will have to be smart and lithe of feet in order to meet these changes. I hope that some of my blatherings are of benefit to those Practices, Independent Hearing Healthcare Practices need to survive. I believe that if that occurs it will be of real benefit to Patients. I hope that I, and my writings will play a small part in their continued success.

2 Comments

  1. This is definitely a concept to consider. I have worked in offices that really could use some sprucing up or modernizing, but management felt that if the place was clean it should be fine. When I opened my office, I made sure the building and restrooms were accessible, and tried to make things as warm, bright and welcoming as possible. So, club chairs in the waiting area, furniture that looks like it could be in your living room instead of a lab, and a Vocalbooth for testing (carpet/fabric walls instead of those metal booths that look like walk-in freezers). I get complimented often!

    • I think you are on the right track. Warm welcoming and comfortable. It helps patients be at their ease, but also speaks well to you as a professional.

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